Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) for Persons with Disabilities (PWD)

Project Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) for Persons with Disabilities (PWD)
Objectives

To raise awareness on disaster preparedness among PWDs and their caretakers

Project Partners 3 Disabled Persons Organisations (DPOs): • Malaysian Association for the Blind (MAB) • Malaysian Federation for the Deaf (MFD) • Society for the Orthopaedically Handicapped Malaysia (SOCAM)
Activities

• 3 DRR sensitisation and introduction workshops with each DPO • 1 workshop with Arbeiter-Samariter Bund (ASB)

Locations Kuala Lumpur
Period January 2010–May 2011
Accomplishments

A total of 70 participants for 4 workshops

Background

In 2009, MERCY Malaysia initiated the project to raise awareness on disaster preparedness among PWDs and their caregivers. Three organisations were approached to establish working collaborations to design specific programme modules and informational material that can be used to support this effort. MERCY Malaysia initiated contact with the Malaysian Association for the Blind (MAB), Malaysian Federation for the Deaf (MFD) and the Society for the Orthopaedically Handicapped Malaysia (POCAM).

MERCY Malaysia efforts

MERCY Malaysia conducted DRR sensitisation and introduction workshops with the staff and volunteers of each DPO to gauge their interest in the subject. The introduction workshop explained why disaster preparedness is important, shared some basic concepts in disaster management, and presented case studies on why it is important to be self-resilient towards disaster threats. A one-day workshop was held with each DPO in order to identify the unique approaches that are necessary in communicating disaster preparedness and DRR messages, as each organisation caters to people with different sets of abilities. Conducted within 23-26 July 2010, the workshops were mainly facilitated by a consultant specialising in DRR training for PWDs through Arbeiter-Samariter Bund (ASB), a German NGO with operations in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. A one-day session was conducted with ASB to help improve MERCY Malaysia’s capacity in approaching PWDs for DRR. It was attended by DRR staff. As a result, all three organisations have identified the best approaches and main obstacles in running DRR programmes within their communities and are eager to move forward with the project. A total of 70 people participated in these workshops.