Health Initiatives for flood affected communities in Sindh, Pakistan

Project Health Initiatives for flood affected communities in Sindh, Pakistan
Objectives

To increase primary health services in remote areas, to rehabilitate health infrastructure and increase capacity of local health providers affected by the 2011 Sindh flood

Project Partners The People and Government of Malaysia
Activities

• Established an outreach clinic running from March to May 2012, consisting of two teams serving at two locations in the Mirpukhas district • Re-construction and expansion of the Rural Health Centre (RHC) Building from August 2012 to January 2013

Locations Sindh, Pakistan (Badin, Mirpukhas and Umerkot districts)
Period January to December 2012
Accomplishments

• Mobile clinics provided free consultations and primary health treatment to 250-300 patients daily, with a total of 22,886 patients during the 3-month operation • Reconstructed and upgraded the Rural Health Centre (RHC) from a basic mixed gendered Outpatient Department to a comprehensive 10-bed hospital with 2 gender-segregated consultation rooms and; other treatment and staff facilities • Data sharing with local Health Authorities on the stationed areas • RHC provided various free medical services, immunisation and Community Management of Accute Malnutrition (CMAM)

Background

Pakistan was hit by massive floods, consecutively in 2010 and 2011 due to torrential rains during the southwest monsoon. The 2011 Sindh flood affected a total of 9.27 million people with 520 reported deaths. The slow disaster recovery plagued the affected population with issues of poor health and sanitation, lack of clean water access, mobility, food and shelter and loss of income.

MERCY Malaysia efforts

Health services were limited due to the unavailability of medical staff and medicines in the local health facilities with households simply unable to afford medical aid. Furthermore, those health facilities have sustained damages and contamination on their premises and equipment from the flooding. In response to the communities’ plight, MERCY Malaysia has set up two mobile clinics in the Mirpukhas district, which provide free consultations and primary health treatment to 250-300 patients daily, totalling 22,886 patients during the 3-month operation. The outreach programme benefited communities with accessibility issues due to poor road conditions and people with disabilities. Useful insights and data were shared with local health authorities for better monitoring of disease outbreaks. MERCY Malaysia successfully expanded the medical capacity of the Rural Health Centre (RHC), building a comprehensive 10-bed hospital with two gender-segregated consultation rooms and; other treatment and staff facilities. RHC provides health services for a population of 30,000, extending to Jhudo, Sindh, Pakistan. There are 25 staff who attend to 150-200 patients each day and 8 to 10 new birth each month. Renovated staff quarters allows ‘stay-in’ doctors to provide 24-hour services and by working shifts. RHC provides nutritional feeding (CMAM) for mild malnutrition cases. Various free treatments and immunisations are offered, to address the affected community’s financial limitations to their healthcare needs.